Mr. C Returns

Quick Fact

Mr. C is back and has taken up residence in my bladder. I know, TMI, but I’m sharing this information because bladder cancer is one of the most common cancers in the U.S., affecting about 68,000 adults each year. According to the Mayo Clinic website, it occurs more often in men than women. I appear to be one of the lucky women who has it. Bladder cancer can happen at any age, but it is more common in older adults. I’m 75, prime time.

Early detection – as is often the case – means treatment is likely to be successful. Someone asked me what stage the cancer is. You’d think I would know, but I don’t. I start treatment next week, one a week for six weeks, followed by two years of treatment, one every three months. With bladder cancer, frequent monitoring is a must as it – as my doctor said – is unlikely to go away permanently. The best course of action is vigilance.

The first procedure, before the treatment plan was determined, took place on May 6, delayed because of COVID-19 and the need for critical care facilities. The procedure determined the presence of tumors and the likelihood they were malignant. Further testing revealed there are tumors, and yes, they are malignant.

The good news is, I won’t have chemo; I’ll undergo an immunotherapy regimen, which is less intrusive and arduous than chemo. It is not without risk as the drug I will be taking contains TB cells, which creates a hostile environment in the bladder that prevents the cancer cells from growing. (I hope I got that right.) I won’t go into detail about what one must do once the drug is eliminated. Suffice it to say one must be VERY careful.

So, prayer is appreciated. No worrying allowed. I’m a tough old nut and have survived Mr. C’s other visitations to my body.

Because it is fairly common, I’m including some of the symptoms you might want to talk to your doctor about if you have them.

Bladder cancer signs and symptoms may include:
• Blood in urine (hematuria)

• Painful urination
• Pelvic pain

If you have hematuria, your urine may appear bright red or cola colored. Sometimes, urine may not look any different, but blood in urine may be detected during a microscopic exam of the urine.

People with bladder cancer might also experience:
• Back pain

• Frequent urination

Be well; stay healthy. As we age, it is ever more important to be alert to symptoms and see the doctor about concerns you may have. It – whatever it is – won’t magically go away, just because you want it to. It’s your health; be proactive. See your health care professional regularly.


I am an indie author of six books and two chap books of poetry. Check the BOOKS tab to find out more. Follow me at www.vandermeerbooks.com, https://www.facebook.com/vandermeerbooks, Amazon Author Central


 

10 Comments on “Mr. C Returns

  1. Dear Sharon: You have my thoughts and prayers as you embark on your treatment for The return of Mr. C. I’m thankful you don’t have to endure chemo. I called one of my 5 chemo infusions “the Red Devil” for a good reason. I was damn close to Stage 4 NH Lymphoma and am 3 years in remission today. I made it and you will too.

    Maridell

    • Thank you, Maridell! Prayers and positive thoughts lift me up as nothing else can. The doc is positive and so am I, especially with the gift of kind friends to power me forward. 🙂

  2. Sharon, sorry to hear about the return of that devil Mr. C. My brother had bladder cancer. I will hold you in my prayers. Hope all goes well with the treatments.
    God Bless you.
    Mia Prieskorn.

    • Thanks, Mia. Prayers are the wings of hope and faith. Emerging treatments make the survival rate much more optimistic. Hope you are doing well in the midst of this health crisis. Be safe. Stay well.

  3. Sharon,

    You are on my heart as you deal with Mr. C. His time is terrible of course in the middle of a raging pandemic, but then his timing is never good. Your sense of humor is amazing a part of your road to recovery.
    Take good care and thanks for sharing and including the symptom.You are helping others.

    Kathleen

    • Thank you! Prayers keep me going and the prognosis with treatment is good. I hope my message gets around and helps others. Thanks for your kindness and comments. Good luck with Flying Cutterbacks! I will be downloading it when it’s available. Can’t wait to read it.

  4. THANK YOU FOR OPENING UP WITH WHAT YOU ARE DEALING AGAIN ON THIS JOURNEY WE CALL GOLDEN YEARS. SHARON YOUR NATURAL INHERENT ABILITY TO BE POSIITVE IS AN INSPIRATION FOR THOSE WHO CROSS YOUR PATH WISHING YOU A SUCCESSFUL TREATMENT. Prayers and love Karen

    • Thank you, Karen. I debated writing about it, but this is my platform and a way to share information I hope will be helpful to others.

  5. Hi Sharon, thank you for sharing this vital information. I was totally unaware of bladder cancer and its prevalence. It is very brave of you to do this. I have a tendency to stick my head in the sand. I truly admire your positive attitude. No worries; lots of prayers.

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